Hunting In Canada

 

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Hunting Tips

Date & From Hunting Tips
2013-10-16
By:Annonymous

Canada Goose Hunting

Cover your face or turn away from the sun. On morning hunts, we waterfowl hunters are often faced with a west wind which points the blinds towards the rising morning sun. First of all. make sure you have a face shield to cover up with. Another good option is to set your blinds facing north of south of the sun (to reduce glare and so you do not have to try to shoot birds directly into the sun). Overload your decoys to one side of your blinds so they will fly across the front of your blinds. If you use the traditional U shape decoy spread, think about making the U into a J with the long arm of the J on the windward side and your blinds at the bottom of the J.
2013-03-07
By:Annonymous

Whitetail Deer Hunting

5 Reasons to Practice at Long Range. (Taken from Field & Stream) 1. Shooting long-range targets demand consistency, in everything from how you breathe to how you hold the rifle, and this consistency carries over into the field. 2. Long range shooters have to understand exterior ballistics - what gravity and wind do to bullets once they leave the bore. Such knowledge, plus experimentation on the range, makes doping wind and estimating distances much easier in the field. 3. Shooting long means shooting a lot, which makes you more familiar with your equipment, which helps no matter what you are shooting at. 4. Shooting success starts between the ears, and a hunter that made 1,000 yard shots on steel has the confidence to ring up a buck at 300 yards because he has been there and done that. 5. A hunter with long-range experience is far less likely to throw lead towards an animal at an unknown distance and in a vicious wind, because he understands the shot uncertainty given the conditions.
2013-03-07
By:Annonymous

Mule Deer Hunting

5 Reasons to Practice at Long Range. (Taken from Field & Stream) 1. Shooting long-range targets demand consistency, in everything from how you breathe to how you hold the rifle, and this consistency carries over into the field. 2. Long range shooters have to understand exterior ballistics - what gravity and wind do to bullets once they leave the bore. Such knowledge, plus experimentation on the range, makes doping wind and estimating distances much easier in the field. 3. Shooting long means shooting a lot, which makes you more familiar with your equipment, which helps no matter what you are shooting at. 4. Shooting success starts between the ears, and a hunter that made 1,000 yard shots on steel has the confidence to ring up a buck at 300 yards because he has been there and done that. 5. A hunter with long-range experience is far less likely to throw lead towards an animal at an unknown distance and in a vicious wind, because he understands the shot uncertainty given the conditions.
2013-03-06
By:Annonymous

Snow Goose Hunting

I have had customer ask how much wind is enough wind to get snow geese to commit properly to the decoys? Usually they are looking for a technical answer like a steady 7 miles per hour, but I have a more practical test. If you can piss into the wind and your boots stay dry, there is not going to be much movement in your decoys and the geese will drift to your decoys from all directions. In these situations you need to have motorized rotator decoys.
2013-03-06
By:Annonymous

Duck Hunting

On passing shots, when birds are moving from left to right, or right to left, use an aiming technique that allows you to see the target. Swing your shot gun muzzle through the target from behind, and swing it slightly below the bird so you can see the target all the way through the shot. ...and dont stop the swing when you pull the trigger, or you will likely shoot behind the bird.
2013-03-06
By:Annonymous

Snow Goose Hunting

On passing shots, when birds are moving from left to right, or right to left, use an aiming technique that allows you to see the target. Swing your shot gun muzzle through the target from behind, and swing it slightly below the bird so you can see the target all the way through the shot. ...and dont stop the swing when you pull the trigger, or you will likely shoot behind the bird.
2013-03-06
By:Annonymous

Canada Goose Hunting

On passing shots, when birds are moving from left to right, or right to left, use an aiming technique that allows you to see the target. Swing your shot gun muzzle through the target from behind, and swing it slightly below the bird so you can see the target all the way through the shot. ...and dont stop the swing when you pull the trigger, or you will likely shoot behind the bird.
2013-02-23
By:Annonymous

Duck Hunting

When hunting over ponds for ducks, you need to consider three factors for choosing your location: wind direction, size of water, and cover. Obviously ducks will land into the wind and the combination of wind direction and water size should determine your location. If the pond or slough is too large to shoot across, position your self on the leading edge of the water so that all ducks have to fly over you, into the wind, to get to the water. If you can shoot across the water, choose to have the water in front of you with the wind at your back. Lastly, find some cover or bring some cover to conceal yourself. If you are on the front edge you need to either be completely covered or you need to blend in completely. If you are on the back edge of the water, you need to make sure you do not have silhouette above the horizon.
2012-08-20
By:Waterfowler

Duck Hunting

If you are a greenhead fanatic, save your shells for October when their heads turn that beautiful emerald color. Go and shoot pintails and canvasbacks and gadwalls until the Mallardd green up.
2012-08-15
By:Back Country

Pheasant Hunting

Pheasant hunting, or any upland bird hunting, is much better with a dog. Pheasants will run if there is no reason to fly. A good hunting dog will cover the ground between the hunters and keep the birds from getting past you and between you.
2012-08-15
By:Annonymous

Snow Goose Hunting

Most often when single snow geese approach a decoy spread they are a juvenile bird and are very determined to join up with the flock on the ground. As young birds, they are not decoy aware so be patient. Give them time to circle lower. You don't need to take an 80 yard when they will circle their way down to a more comfortable range. Usually singles will make up to 4 or 5 passes, gradually working their way lower.
2012-08-15
By:Waterfowler

Canada Goose Hunting

If you are setting out snow goose and Canada goose decoys in the same spread, put the Canada goose decoys out front. Canadian geese will rarely fly over snow geese to land, but snow geese will fly over Canada's.
2011-12-05
By:Annonymous

Black Bear Hunting

Black bears can be attracted to the smell of rotting meat, but actually prefer fresher kills and when happening upon an animal carcass, will sometimes eat only the freshest parts. If you are baiting for bears, freshen the bait barrel often to keep the bears returning.
2011-07-13
By:Waterfowler

Canada Goose Hunting

Make sure you are well equipped and well practiced with your goose calls before you start blowing them this fall. Poor callers mess up more shooting opportunities than dogs running around in the decoy spread. If you cant call, dont. Oh ya, and dont blow a snow goose call and expect the big Canadas to turn. They only react to their own kind.
2011-07-12
By:Waterfowler

Duck Hunting

With high water levels expected this fall, ducks will have numerous bodies of water to go to. To improve your hunting parties chance for success, split up your group on two neighboring ponds or sloughs and try to catch them bouncing in between. If the ducks get shot off one pond, they will usually look for the next closest body of water.
2011-07-12
By:Buckhunter

Whitetail Deer Hunting

The best whitetail hunting asset you have is your knowledge of the area. Spend some time scouting during pre-rut time to learn the movement patterns of the deer and to learn where the bucks are. When the season opens, your chances will be improved.
2011-04-04
By:Annonymous

Caribou Hunting

So this is the obvious one, to hunt Caribou you need to be way up north, in the Canadian arctic. So, bring more clothes than you can possible imagine, it's the friggin arctic! Just when you think a nice day is happening, the north west wind bring in a cold blast. If you are caught out on the tundra, unprepared, you'll turn into a popsicle. Oh yeah, and bring a gun with a flat trajectory. There's a lot of open space when you are hunting Caribou and the shots can get long.
2010-08-30
By:Annonymous

Canada Goose Hunting

If you plan to pass shoot geese, make sure you have a plan and you have scouted the area first. If you are familiar with the major bird holding water holes and where they have been feeding in large numbers, then you have some pretty good information to work with. Make sure you spread out 100 yards apart or more, accross the flight path of the birds, That way someone will have a shot and you stay safe from each other. Often birds will flare to the side on the first shot giving another hunter a shot down the line.
2010-08-27
By:Woodsman

Whitetail Deer Hunting

After you have selected a likely spot for big bucks, plan your placement of treestands carefully. When hanging treestands, choose trees which are wider than your own body to help hide your silhouette. Also, if you have two, place them on opposite sides of where you expect the deer so that you can adjust to different wind directions.
2010-08-24
By:Woodsman

Duck Hunting

In late season, ducks will travel in smaller groups. Set up your decoys in smaller groups, 8 to 10 in a group. Set the groups 25 to 50 feet apart. If your are hunting ducks near water, make sure you have some floaters out on the water.
2010-07-10
By:Waterfowl hunter

Duck Hunting

Late season duck hunting is different than early season. Flocks are often smaller and your decoy spread should be set differently. Set your decoys in several smaller groups of 6 to 10 decoys. Place the groups 20 to 30 yards apart.
2010-07-03
By:Annonymous

Whitetail Deer Hunting

Whitetail bucks are more cautious in the early season. Once the rut is in full swing, they are less attentive and more interested in chasing does. This may be your time to knock down the best buck. Watch the does late in the season as the bucks will not be far behind.
2010-06-28
By:Annonymous

Black Bear Hunting

Black Bears are very cautious creatures. Any unusual sound or scent will enough to keep them away from an area. When you are setting up your bait barrels, leave as little human scent behind as possible.
2010-06-24
By:Annonymous

Snow Goose Hunting

Snow Geese return in the morning to the field they fed in the previous night. go out and drive the field (spotting) in the late afternoon / early evening to see what fields and where in the fields they are feeding and if possible what water body they will be roosting in overnight. Set up the next morning near the spot they were feeding.
2010-06-24
By:Annonymous

Canada Goose Hunting

Canadian Geese normally head to the fields twice a day to feed in the fall. Between sunrise and mid morning all the Canada's will have left the water to find food, returning to the water for midday. By early to mid-afternoon, they will head out to the fields again until shortly before dark.
2010-06-24
By:Annonymous

Canada Goose Hunting

If you are planning on back shooting geese, the best time is about one hour before sunset when they are beginning to arrive back from the fields. Pick a location close to the water line and in a direct path with the fields where they are feeding.
2010-06-24
By:Annonymous

Duck Hunting

The first birds to arrive to your early morning decoy spread will be ducks. Get ready for them with duck loads in your shot gun instead of goose loads. Keep your #2 and BBB handy for when the geese come later.
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376 yd shot
376 yd shot
Kyle's Shoveler duck
Kyle's Shoveler duck
its not a great picture but it really is true
its not a great picture but it really is true
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